Advertisement

Articles
January 23, 2014 /

After the Tsunami, at the 'Women’s River'

The towns in Japan’s Tōhoku region were practically wiped off the face of the earth by the tsunami on March 9, 2011. What little remains is hastily being replaced by new settlements built on elevated plateaus. No memorials are wanted. But former residents – and architect initiatives such as Architecture for Humanity – disagree with the hasty reconstruction plans made up by the central government.

Bookcase
January 22, 2014 /

A Question of Qualities: Essays in Architecture
By Jeffrey Kipnis

Jeffrey Kipnis’ collection of mind-blowing theoretical essays in architecture addresses the question of qualities. Yet stimulated by contemporary architecture’s sensorial affects and epistemic potentials, it also points to the discursive capacities of critical writing as such. The book is a remarkable insight into the mind of one of today’s most piercing and playful architectural thinkers.

Musashino Art University Library by Sou Fujimoto in Tokyo, Japan. Photo courtesy Sou Fujimoto Architects Features
January 20, 2014 /

Musashino Art University Library
Sou Fujimoto
Tokyo, Japan

Sou Fujimoto’s new library for the famous Musashino Art University in Tokyo, Japan, suggests that in the internet-age a library is just that: a library! All it needs are good lighting, good orientation, bookshelves, and nice reading areas. Fujimoto’s Musashino Art University Library has all these ingredients, and more.

Articles
January 17, 2014 /

Touring the World of Architecture: Week 3

This week, some good news for Frank Gehry, some not-so-great news for OMA, and the Shard is about to get a baby brother. Then, Foster proposes a bold scheme for London cyclists and a dreamlike video of LA.

Tamedia Office Building by Shigeru Ban in Zürich, Switzerland. Tamedia Office Building.  Exterior view. Photo © Didier Boy de La Tour Features
January 16, 2014 /

Tamedia Office Building
Shigeru Ban
Zürich, Switzerland

The use of wood in multi-storey buildings is an art form almost completely buried a hundred years ago. Reinforced concrete structures became the norm worldwide. In recent years, however, the sustainability debate has brought a renaissance to wood and an interest in large, urban, wooden structures has awakened. Shigeru Ban, well-known for his use of paper and paperboard, has built an office building in Zurich made entirely of wood, or to be more precise 2,000 m3 of Austrian spruce.

Copyright 1999 - 2014 arcspace all rights reserved.

Feedback